Men Will Be Men and Women Will Be Women; or, The Sexual Frontier of Epic Westerns

Westerns = Greek drama. And shut up, Aeschylus is so not rolling in his grave.

He’d have appreciated the golden-boy good looks of John Wayne in John Ford’s Stagecoach and the film’s subtle yet sharp critique on so-called civilized society–the stagecoach journey as a vehicle for a development of a humane community  that cannot survive in . . . → Read More: Men Will Be Men and Women Will Be Women; or, The Sexual Frontier of Epic Westerns

The Girls of Westerns, Part 3; or, The Wild Woman

You know you’ve seen her.

She’s the stunning beauty with the hair over her eyes, the “other woman” standing in the shadows apart from the stalwart white woman.

She is either mute or deranged or she can’t speak English. She is often a figure of fun, the buffoon. She can be Native American, or Spanish, comely or the butt . . . → Read More: The Girls of Westerns, Part 3; or, The Wild Woman

Yu So-chow Rocks; or, A Silver-Screen Western/Eastern Heroine

Silver-screen western heroines have it tough.

They’re not as pioneer-hard as actual historical Western women, and they have the added burden of the madonna/whore paradox, eternally scripted as being either the sweet Clementines or the volatile Chihuahuas of the Silver-Screen West.

Henry Fonda and Cathy Downs (Clementine)

Victor Mature, Linda Darnell (Chihuahua), and another goddamn fake saguaro

(Not . . . → Read More: Yu So-chow Rocks; or, A Silver-Screen Western/Eastern Heroine

Cowgirl Power; or Two-Gun Nan Aspinwall

Day of the Cowboy (this Saturday) needs some girl power, and Two-Gun Nan fills those boots and how.
Thanks to Petticoats & Pistols‘ Mary Connealy, this original buckarette can shine her light into the 21st century.
Born in Nebraska in 1880, Nan Aspinwall was a skillful stunt rider, sharpshooter, and bull rider. (Whoo-hoo!) She was so skillful she . . . → Read More: Cowgirl Power; or Two-Gun Nan Aspinwall