Sagas of Fighting Men and Flaming Guns; Max Brand’s Words Move Me

A mighty happy (um, late) birthday to Max Brand! He never thought much of his westerns between May 29, 1892 and May 12, 1944, but I can’t hold that against him for too long. If you had been named Frederick Schiller Faust, you might have wanted to be a high-falutin’ poet too.

Unlike many pulp western writers, . . . → Read More: Sagas of Fighting Men and Flaming Guns; Max Brand’s Words Move Me

Thirty Million Words Can’t Be Wrong; or, Max Brand and His Pulps

What better way to be miserable over the slow pace of revisions than celebrating a prolific author?

THE MAN I LOVE TO HATE

Frederick Faust, aka Max Brand

Max Brand (Frederick Schiller Faust) wrote close to 30,000,000 words in his lifetime, and was clocked at 12,000 . . . → Read More: Thirty Million Words Can’t Be Wrong; or, Max Brand and His Pulps

Elmer Kelton 1926-2009; or, Happy Trails

“I have often been asked how my characters differ from the traditional, larger-than-life heroes of the mythical West,” Mr. Kelton said in an interview with The Dallas Morning News in 2007. “ ‘Those,’ I reply, ‘are seven feet tall and invincible. My characters are 5-8 and nervous.’ ”

Elmer Kelton died August 22 in Texas, after a long and . . . → Read More: Elmer Kelton 1926-2009; or, Happy Trails

What Does Ida Hoe?

I’ll let you know.

For a few days I’ll be on real trails, hunting down cowboys and cow patties, spuds and starlit nights, lava bombs and limpid lakes, and real live rigamorole. And when I am back, I will deal with the wackness that is the site. (Anyone notice the blessed space that appears and disappears on . . . → Read More: What Does Ida Hoe?

A Cowboy’s Life; 51…32…

32. Life is more interesting as a Cowboy.

You’ve got to be careful with this Cowboy thing, but with judicious application, the most mundane duties become charged with Mythic meaning.

from Gunman’s Gold, by Max Brand

Pocket Books, 1960

illustrator unknown

Last Stand! Trapped! Brush Fire! or Die! When this is truly the case, you . . . → Read More: A Cowboy’s Life; 51…32…